Saturday, Apr 29, 2017

Opinion

The manifest dreadfulness of the Syrian crisis has now driven almost five million people from the country, with another seven million displaced internally. Unless the exodus is halted, Syria will be condemned to irreversible, terminal decline. L

In normal times, you’d say everything went swimmingly. Sure, the American President, Donald Trump, seemed a tad unsure how to say the name of his guest — whom he greeted as Ter-raiser – slightly reinforcing the White House&rsqu

The manifest dreadfulness of the Syrian crisis has now driven almost five million people from the country, with another seven million displaced internally. Unless the exodus is halted, Syria will be condemned to irreversible, terminal decline. Last week,

When 27-year-old reporter William W. Price came to Washington from South Carolina in 1895, there was no such thing as a White House beat. Then Price, working for the Washington Evening Star, began calling himself a “White House correspondent” and getting

In normal times, you’d say everything went swimmingly. Sure, the American President, Donald Trump, seemed a tad unsure how to say the name of his guest — whom he greeted as Ter-raiser – slightly reinforcing the White House’s earlier failure, in a briefing

It is unfortunate that so few international agreements have been reached in recent years. During a period when great-power competition has generally trumped cooperation, two significant exceptions — the Iran nuclear deal and the Paris climate agreement —

Margaret Thatcher, much mentioned by Theresa May on the eve of meeting Donald Trump, often liked to say: “There is no alternative” (Tina, for short). May didn’t use those words this week, but perhaps she should have, for that w

The British Supreme Court’s judgement on Tuesday requiring parliament to authorise Brexit was conservative in the deepest and best sense of the term. Allowing the government to withdraw from the European Union without a parliamentary vote

The planet has broken global heat records for three years in a row — a finding that, paradoxically, may raise public concern about global warming but won’t change long-term climate forecasts. First, the good news: Scientists say the

Margaret Thatcher, much mentioned by Theresa May on the eve of meeting Donald Trump, often liked to say: “There is no alternative” (Tina, for short). May didn’t use those words this week, but perhaps she should have, for that was the thrust of her message