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August attacks leave 1,641 people dead in Afghanistan

Monitoring Desk

KABUL: Attacks decreased by 33 percent in August compared to July in Afghanistan, leaving 1,641 people dead and another 1,113 injured in 30 out of the country’s total 34 provinces.

Based on reporters, 12 people suffered casualties in each attack in July compared to 17 casualties in each attack in August.

The Afghan government in July announced it was ready for a three-month ceasefire starting from the first day of Eidul Adha on the condition if the Taliban reciprocated.

However, the Taliban did not join the ceasefire and therefor the Afghan government continued its operations against the insurgents.

Though the Taliban denied ceasefire, their attacks during the three holidays of Eidul Adha decreased, compared to other days.

During Eid holidays, 19 people on average suffered casualties compared to around 100 people in ordinary days.

Last year in August, 3,059 people suffered casualties, showing a nine percent increase in casualties compared to the same period this year.

According to Pajhwok reports from different areas of the country, there were 163 attacks in August compared to 239 attacks in July.

In these attacks, according to Pajhwok reports, 1,641 people were killed and 1,113 others injured in 30 out of the total 34 provinces.

In August, among every 28 victims, 19 suffered casualties in face to face fighting between insurgents and security forces, three in suicide attacks, two each in airstrikes, targeted attacks and blasts.

Most of the attacks (18) happened in Faryab,14 in Nangarhar, 12 in Kabul, 11 in Helmand, 10 in Kandahar and the rest 98 in other 25 provinces. There were no reports of attacks in Bamyan, Nuristan, Samangan and Panjsher provinces in August.

Military affairs analysts blame the high number of attacks in Faryab and Nangarhar provinces on the presence of Daesh or Islamic State (IS) there in addition to the Taliban.

They say insurgents try to carry out more attacks in capital Kabul to show themselves powerful to the world.

Ministry of Defense (MoD) officials say Afghan forces operations are more focused on areas where militants are more active.

Casualties

According to Pajhwok reports, 1,754 people lost their lives and another 1,028 were wounded in the month of August.

Rebels, security forces and civilians were among the dead and wounded, but Pajhwok could not share separate and exact numbers of the dead and injured because different sources provided different figures.

However, Civilian Protection Advocacy Group (CPAG)’s findings show that 261 civilians were killed and 524 others wounded in 19 provinces of the country in August.

Violent incidents were recorded everyday last month, but the deadliest attack took place on August 19 on Ghazni City, which continued for four days.

According to the Ministry of Defence (MoD), 319 people were killed and 147 others injured in the attacks.

In July, most of the casualties took place in Nangarhar, Ghazni, Paktia and Jawzjan, Kunduz, Faryab, Kandahar, Kabul, Farah and Helmand provinces.

Government forces and foreign troops in Afghanistan have been fighting the Taliban and other armed insurgent groups for the past 17 years.

The experience of the past years shows the fighting surges in Afghanistan during summer and declines in winter.

According to Pajhwok reports last year, fighting and casualties declined in winter and fall.

During the first eight months of last year, 17,000 people suffered casualties compared to 18,000 casualties this year during the same period.

Last year, 25,000 people have been killed and injured in Afghanistan.

Stop fighting and reconcile — The voice of individuals who lost their family members to the ongoing fighting.

Mohammad Hassan, a cousin of Zakia who was killed in the armed attack on an educational centre in Kabul last month, said the loss of Zakia brought an unforgettable sorrow and grief to their family. Her mother suffered a heart attack.

“She was a polite and decent girl and was in her last year of school. She wanted to get prepared for the Kankor examination.”

Nazanin, a resident of Farah province, who lost her father in a blast, said she studied in third class. “Peace is blessing, I could become a doctor if there is peace. My father in police who was killed by the Taliban, I want the Taliban to reconcile and stop fighting.”

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