Monitoring Desk

Commuters wear face masks and social distance while riding an M Train, Tuesday, March 9, 2021, in New York’s subway system. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Pedestrians cross 42nd Street, Thursday, March 4, 2021, in New York. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
FILE – In this March 23, 2020, file photo, a commuter crosses 42nd Street in front of Grand Central Terminal during morning rush hour, in New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
Customers browse produce in a sparsely populated Arthur Avenue Retail Market, a collection of historically Italian immigrant businesses within the community, during midday working hours, Wednesday, March 3, 2021, in the Bronx borough of New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
An amplifier is built into a protective plastic shield due to COVID-19 concerns at Borgatti’s Ravioli & Egg Noodles, a speciality pasta shop off Arthur Avenue, a historically Italian immigrant community known for its ethnic food and products, Wednesday, March 3, 2021, in the Bronx borough of New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Gloribelle Perez has her temperature taken by her son Adam in Barcha, her East Harlem restaurant, Friday, Feb. 26, 2021 in New York. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis is adapting and showing new life. “What is the alternative? Just close the doors and stay home?” asked Perez, who opened a restaurant with her husband only months before the pandemic hit. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
FILE – In this Friday, April 3, 2020, photo, a woman walks by local stores during the coronavirus pandemic in New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
Pedestrians pass outdoor diners on Arthur Avenue, a historically Italian immigrant community known for its ethnic products and produce, Wednesday, March 3, 2021, in the Bronx borough of New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Customers order pastries at from behind protective glass and masks at Artuso Pastry Shop, an Italian American confectionary within the historically Italian immigrant community surrounding Arthur Avenue, Wednesday, March 3, 2021, in the Bronx borough of New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
David Greco of Mike’s Deli, an Italian delicatessen within the Arthur Avenue Retail Market situated in the historically Italian immigrant neighborhood of the Bronx borough, sits in his company’s outdoor dining space, Wednesday, March 3, 2021, in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Pastry cooks fill pie molds while wearing protective masks and gloves at Artuso Pastry Shop, an Italian American confectionary within the historically Italian immigrant community surrounding Arther Avenue, Wednesday, March 3, 2021, in the Bronx borough of New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Various hats and masks are displayed on mannequin heads, Tuesday, March 9, 2021 in the Bronx borough of New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Commuters walk through the main waiting area of Grand Central Terminal, Tuesday, March 9, 2021, in New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
A commuter wears a face shield while standing in the main waiting area of Grand Central Terminal, Tuesday, March 9, 2021, in New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Commuters wear face masks while waiting for their Metro North train to leave Grand Central Terminal, Tuesday, March 9, 2021, in New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Costumed performers walk through Times Square in New York, Wednesday, March 10, 2021. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
A woman wipes down chair before sitting on it in Times Square in New York, Wednesday, March 10, 2021. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
FILE – In this April 17, 2020, file photo, pedestrians and cyclists move through Times Square in New York. New York City streets are largely empty as people continue to stay at home to prevent the spread of COVID-19. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)
People enjoy a sunny day in Times Square in New York, Wednesday, March 10, 2021. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Two woman take a picture of themselves in Times Square in New York, Wednesday, March 10, 2021. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
People wait in line on a Bronx sidewalk before entering a bank, Tuesday, March 9, 2021, in New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
FILE – In this March 16, 2020, file photo, a corridor in the World Trade Center’s transportation hub is sparsely occupied in New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
Commuters practice social distancing as they walk through a corridor at the World Trade Center, Thursday, March 4, 2021, in New York. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Al Ramos, front, and fellow musicians perform for a small crowd at a sea shanty sing, Saturday, March 6, 2021, in New York. The event was coordinated by Porch Stomp, an organization that promotes American folk music. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
People play volleyball on the Coney Island beach, Wednesday, March 10, 2021, in New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Boys ride their bikes on the Coney Island boardwalk, Wednesday, March 10, 2021 in New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Children play on Reflect, an art installation by artist Jen Lewin in Brooklyn’s Domino Park near the base of the Manhattan Bridge, Wednesday, March 10, 2021, in New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Aeon Elliott models a gown for a fashion shoot while standing on the Edge, an outdoor observation deck overlooking Manhattan, March 2, 2021 in New York. After the virus descended on New York, the only sounds in the streets were wailing ambulance sirens. A year after the pandemic began, the nation’s largest metropolis — with a lifeblood based on round-the-clock hustle and bustle, push and pull — is adapting and showing new life. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Courtesy: AP News

About the author

The Frontier Post

Leave a Reply