Education sector reforms

Education sector reforms

The reforms introduced in elementary and secondary education in Khyber Pukhtunkhwa did raise the quality of education in government schools up to some extent and relatively increased the number of students in urban areas but it does not fully justify the governments claim to have fully restored the confidence of the people in these institutions and is focused in prompting education at all levels. The process of reforms must continue not only in school education but in higher education as well. The curriculum updating and provision of text books with quality material free from errors is essential.

After the devolution of higher education to provinces under 18th Amendment, its cost has gone up. There is utter neglect of instrumentation of science and engineering labs and dearth of reference books and lack of access to top notch research journals. There is no accountability mechanism for the faculty in public sector universities, who are not regularly taking classes and do not provide necessary guidance to students in the completion and vetting of research work. The financial crisis in government universities have led to the slamming of doors on research in M Phil study programmes and degrees are awarded to students on the completion of course work only to make room for new enrolments to augment financial resources of the institution. The exclusion of research work in higher education will certainly degenerate the quality of education. It is for the government to take appropriate measures for addressing the inefficiencies in higher education.

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